Text and Image

There’s a great show at Site: Brooklyn on word-based art, juried by Edith Newhall, the art critic for the Philadelphia Inquirer.  Featuring the work of some 50-odd artists, the  exhibit highlights the intersection of text and image, in many ingenious ways.

History of Flight One, Ian Campbell, mixed media

The title of Ian Campbell’s piece, History of Flight One, is the title of a book whose images form the basis of this collaged piece.  Campbell cut each lithograph, over which he laid one or more pieces of polyester film, and then wrote on them, repeating this process several times. By layering and tiering the lithographs, he’s created an image that has a lot of depth. 

Rorschach, Annette Barbier, modified book

Annette Barbier has chosen to use a book – Breakout, by Martin Russ, about a battle in Korea by the US Marines) as a sculptural material – which could explain the way the figures seem to be trying to escape from the book, as well as the piece’s title.

Is it Working?, Kara Dunne, screenprint on fan

For Kara Dunne, it’s important that her art be seen and that it be affordable, so she often screenprints her work on low-cost items.  She got the idea for Is It Working? from an old hand fan which was filled with patriotic imagery. Dunne updated the image of the woman, putting her in a suit, to reflect that today women work, and changed the houses in the background to a row of brownstones. Dunne also added the words “working away from” after the words “The American Dream”, reflecting her view that this ideal is no longer attainable.

RichardGabriele_Palimpsest_Blue_No3 (image courtesy of the artist)

Richard Gabriele’s inspiration for his work came from two books: “The Lotos Eaters” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and the Odyssey by Homer.  In order to “flood the plane with calligraphy,” he painted successive layers of different colors, starting with the background, for which he used watercolors.   Then, using egg tempera, he overlayed it with rows of Greek letters, then turned the paper 90º and wrote in cursive English. I love the way the colors bleed onto the edges of the paper.

Expecto Pantronum, Brooke Jana (image courtesy of the artist)

Brooke Jana created this stag from strips which each contain a spell from the Harry Potter series, and took the work’s title, Expecto Patronum from the spell that he uses to conjure the stag.

Murmuring House, Jung Eun Park, embroidery thread, pencil, paper collage on Korean paper

I’d love to see the front of this piece to hear what the house is murmuring ….  On her website, the artist Jung Eun Park says that these works “are simply the record of my intimate life, but also imply the psychological narratives of human being living in a new environment.”  I was drawn to this piece by it’s simplicity, and the embroidery.

Guns and Roses, Francine Gintoff, oil pastel on paper

Francine Gintoff’s work is primarily large format drawing, combined with oil pastel in pink and indigo, evoking vintage tattoos.  She always includes the title of the work directly in it, seeing it as integral to the piece.  The images have personal significance to the artist, creating her own visual poetry.

Letters from Home, Dare Boles, collage

Dare Bole’s piece links the African and African-American families in this collage, not only through the letters which join both halves of the canvas, but also through her depiction of the role of women in both communities, and the red and white dresses in one half that play on the brick pattern in the other.

L.B.D., Andrew Neumann, vinyl letters, wood and paint

I found this piece, L.B.D. by Andrew Neumann to be lots of fun.

Do see the show before it closes on July 16th.  Site: Brooklyn is in the Gowanus neighborhood, at 165 Seventh Street.

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