Bruno Miguel: Seduction and Reason

Bruno Miguel (1981) trained as a painter in his native Brazil – however, that might not be your first thought walking through his show at Sapar Contemporary.  Not content with the two-dimensional plane, Miguel uses everything except canvas as a platform for his colors.  Rather than painting horizontally, he unpacks the elements of a painting, then stacks them vertically – almost as if he were painting in three dimensions.  Through his mixing of traditional, luxury, quotidian, festive and personal elements, the artist creates an opportunity for new narratives.

Fé (Faith) from series Sala de Jantar (Dining Room), Bruno Miguel, 2014, Oil and colorjet paint on set of 54 porcelain and earthenware plates purchased in antique and solid round plates of enamel paint

As you enter the gallery, your eye will be caught by Fé (Faith) from the series Sala de Jantar (Dining Room) (2013), which takes up the better part of the wall.  As you approach this cross-shaped sculpture, you’ll see that it is made from antique porcelain and earthenware plates.  Look closer, and you’ll see that they’ve all been manipulated by the artist in some way –

detail, Fé (Faith) from series Sala de Jantar (Dining Room), Bruno Miguel, 2014, Oil and colorjet paint on set of 54 porcelain and earthenware plates purchased in antique and solid round plates of enamel paint

sometimes he painted over them, or he painted designs on them, or he put down several layers of paint, covered them with masking tape, and then cut into the tape or reshaped it.

detail, Cafezinho? (Coffee?) (mother), Bruno Miguel, 2014, Polyester resin and pigment on 31 plastic cups that belonged to the artist’s mother

If you look to the left, however, you’ll find two works that take you into the artists’ personal life while simultaneously reflecting on the history of immigration in Brazil.  In the front window is  Cafezinho? (Coffee?) (2014), a collection of 31 small coffee mugs, used by his mother to serve coffee to her guests, especially when she had Tupperware parties.  By filling these cups with brightly colored – indeed Carnival colored – resins, the artist seems to be linking his mother’s identity as an immigrant with his identity as a first-generation Brazilian (his mother was from Mozambique and father from Portugal). 

Todas as cores (All the colors) (father), Bruno Miguel, 2014, Polyester resin and pigment on 3 shot glasses that belonged to the artist’s father

Nearby you’ll find Todas as cores (All Colors) (2014), three  shot glasses which belonged to his father, who was an alcoholic.  By filling them with bright resins, the artist is rewriting his history, without judgement, and linking it to his artistic practice.

49 from the series Essas Pessoas na Sala de Jantar (These People in the Dining Room), Bruno Miguel, 2012-2014, Spray paint, cold porcelain, polyurethane foam, wire, acrylic resin and paper-mâché on porcelain bought at an antique auction

In the rear of the gallery, on the floor, you’ll find Essas Pessoas na Sala de Jantar (Those People In the Dining Room) (2012–2015), a riot of whimsical sculptures of tropical trees and fantastical islands/creatures that might bring to mind  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince; when you look closer, you’ll notice that these islands/creatures seem to be simultaneously swallowing and spouting antique porcelain cups and saucers.   For the artist, porcelain reminds him of dinner conversations, and he uses it as a way of inviting dialogue with the viewer.  With these works, Miguel plays these traditional, serious tea sets (which he purchased at auction) against the bright, playful Carnival materials that engulf them, inviting the viewer to consider how history is absorbed and presented.

New Neoconcrete, #8 from the series Totems, Bruno Miguel, 2015, Oil paint and spray on sign with wood

On the lower level you’ll find work in a completely different style: four neo-concrete totems, that were made from actual New York City parking signs (who hasn’t wanted to paint over them?)  This one, New Neoconcrete #8 is dedicated to the Brazilian Neo-Concrete artist Hélio Oiticica.

This is only a small selection of the work you’ll find in Bruno Miguel: Seduction and Reason, which is on only until November 5th.  So get over to  Sapar Contemporary Gallery, 9 North Moore Street in Tribeca soon!

Brazilian Luciana Brito Opens a Gallery in NYC

Last month I attended the opening of Luciana Brito-NY Project  in Tribeca.  Hailing from São Paulo, Brazil, where she’s had her eponymous gallery since 1997, Brito will be collaborating with Espasso Annex, a gallery for vintage Brazilian furniture, where she’ll mount three exhibits over the next twelve months.  It’s great to have a leading Brazilian gallerist bringing her country’s artists to the Big Apple.  Welcome Luciana!

The current show is dedicated to the works of artists associated with the Brazilian Ruptura movement.  Founded in the 1950‘s by Geraldo de Barros, Waldemar Cordeiro, Luiz Sacilotto, Lothar Charoux, Kazmer Féjer, Leopoldo Haar and Anatol Wladyslaw, they sought to move art away from figurative representation to art based on “space-time, movement and material.”  These artists were part of a larger movement of concrete art, that, like constructivism, was born from post WW1 art upheavals.  I was not familiar with Grupo Ruptura, so it was great to learn about them.   I was struck by the clean lines, bursts of pure color, and industrial materials in much of the work. Below are some of the highlights:

Idéia Visivel, Waldemar Cordeiro, 1951, enamel on Kelmite

Waldemar Cordeiro (1924-73) was born in Rome to an Italian mother and a Brazilian father.  After studying art in Italy, he emigrated to São Paulo, initially working as a journalist, art critic and newspaper caricaturist. In 1952 he co-founded Grupo Ruptura, the São Paulo branch of the Brazilian concrete art movement.  In the picture above, painted a year earlier, he’s already articulating many of the ideas he would later publish in the group’s Manifesto.  In the 1960’s he became one of the first Brazilian visual artists to use computers in his work.

Arranjo de Trés Formas Semelhantes Dentro de Um Circulo, Geraldo de Barros, 1963, enamel on Kelmite

A central figure in the Brazilian Concrete art movement, noted especially for his photography (scratched negatives, multiple exposures, montages) and painting, Geraldo de Barros (1923-98), was also a furniture designer (in 1954 he established a furniture factory, Unilabor.)             I especially liked the rhythmic feel of the above painting, and the use of enamel gives the colors some punch.

Concreto 101, Judith Lauand, 1958, china ink on paper

Judith Lauand (born 1922) was the only female artist invited to join Grupo Ruptura.  A painter and printmaker, who trained as a fine artist,  she’s known for her modernist geometric free-floating abstractions.

Untitled, Luiz Sacilotto, 1955/1980, oil on fiberboard

Luiz Sacilotto’s (1924-2003) work spans painting, printmaking, sculpture, design and architecture.  He studied drawing at the Brazilian Association of Fine Arts, painted landscapes, still lifes and portraits, then moved on to Expressionism, which he left for geometric abstraction.  His work, with its squares, parallel lines, diagonals,  and symmetry was a major precursor of op-art in Brazil.

Untitled, Anatol Wladyslaw, 1960, gouache on paper

Anatol Wladyslaw (1913-2004) started his professional life as an electrical engineer, but in 1944, he began studying painting and drawing.  His early works were geometric in style, then he moved to informal abstraction and figuration.   I like the energy of this gouache.

This is a small sampling of the works you’ll find in this show, which will be on until November 6th. Don’t wait until then to see it.

Luciana Brito-NY Project is located at 186 Franklin Street.