Marvelous Textiles in Midtown Manhattan

The next time you’re in midtown, be sure to get over to the lobby of 1133 Avenue of the Americas (43rd & 44th Street) to see Yard Works, an exhibit of textile art made by the members of the Textile Study Group of New York .  If you’re not in midtown, it’s worth a trip from wherever you are. The show, which will be up until November 16th, was organized by Chashama, which partners with property owners to use their available space to show artwork  and stage performances.  The title, Yard Works, refers to a restriction that was imposed on the participants: their work had to be on stretched canvasses one yard (36 inches) in length (but could vary in width from 12 inches to 36 inches).  The resulting 21 pieces employ a range of fabrics, techniques and embellishments.  The caliber of this show is very high, and I’ll let the photos do the talking:

Behold the Hostas in Our Backyard by Margaret Cusak

Behold the Hostas in Our Backyard by Margaret Cusak

Behold the Hostas in Our Back Yard by Margaret Cusack, is an appliqué scene of her back yard.  I’ve long admired Margaret’s work, but the cutting and sewing of this piece are a testament to the artist’s patience and skill – the paving stones and the cut out work in the table in the lower right corner are amazing.

detail from Out on a Limb, by Deborah L. Brand

detail from Out on a Limb, by Deborah L. Brand

Out on a Limb by Deborah L. Brand, is a mixed media which incorporates metal, paper, lace, paint and beads.  The beaded birds are fabulous.

May Your Hands Always be Busy, by Barbara Schulman

May Your Hands Always be Busy, by Barbara Schulman

May Your Hands Alway be Busy by Barbara Schulman, a mixed-media piece whose bright colors will catch your eye, but be sure to look a bit deeper for the hand motif which appears very subtly throughout.

Colors of the Southwest, by Larry Schulte

Colors of the Southwest, by Larry Schulte

Colors of the Southwest by Larry Schulte, offers a different take on textiles:  the piece, with its stunning colors is made from painted paper which was woven.

detail from Laundry List by Kathryn Kosto

detail from Laundry List by Kathryn Kosto

Laundry List by Kathryn Kosto is a very clever interpretation of its title:  look closely and you’ll find not only clothes pins, but rulers, buttons, lace, a needle package, and other surprises such as an ad for a mop wringer from 1830!

This is a small selection from the show which will be up until November 16th.  Be sure to see it!